The Offer

Become a part of this exciting concept and be first in with the exclusive right to purchase £2,000,000 of pristine bulk water.

shipping

  • 400,000 tons of pristine water
  • Established shipping technological experts on hand to ship water virtually anywhere in the world
  • Tank container or other
  • We can organise shipping to any destination in the world. (Shipping costs not included)
  • A pre-purchase of GBP £2,000,000 gives the buyer the exclusive right to market the water for a two year period.
  • Virtually unlimited access to the worlds only known bulk water supplies
  • Be apart of the development team for bulk water transport
  • GBP £2,000,000 of pre purchased Bulk Water @ USD $8.00 per Metric Ton sold at the manifold.

Water Sources in Place

 

island1

Alaska (Island 1)

  • Exclusive Water Purchase Agreement, dated July 15th, 2010, granting us the right to purchase raw bulk water from a supply on the Island for a period of fifteen (15) years
  • Bulk water export license from the state of Alaska to export 500,000 gallons per day
  • Hydrology reports & engineering survey completed.

island2

Alaska (Island 2)

  • Exclusive Renewable Water Purchase Agreement with City and Borough dated June 21st, 2016, for a period of twenty (20) years
  • Government approval in place
  • Eight Billion US gallons available annually
  • Hydrology reports & engineering survey completed.

island3

Caribbean (Island)

  • Exclusive Renewable Water Purchase Agreement and the government of the Island dated May 27th, 2016, period of fifteen (15) years
  • Government approval in place
  • Four Seaport Docking locations
  • Hydrology reports & engineering survey completed.
 

Target Markets

China

  • Demand for water is not aligned with supply
  • An estimated 70% of China’s rivers are polluted, leaving an estimated 300 million people with limited access to clean water
  • China will have exploited all available water supplies to the limit by 2030, the Chinese government has warned
  • Established relationship with existing beverage packaging company.

GCC Countries - Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE- United Arab Emirates

Potential bulk water sales to all GCC countries currently under negotiation.

Dubai and the GCC Countries

  • Dubai is built within the Arabian Desert and is recognised as one of the fastest growing cities in the world
  • Demand for water is not aligned with supply
  • The UAE is using over 70 per cent of domestic energy to supply and transport water
  • Seventy percent of desalination plants in the world are located in the Middle East, mostly in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, and Bahrain.
  • Desalination Plants can create problems for health and the environment. The seawater used in desalination plants can contain high amounts of boron and bromide which can be hazardous.

The International Water Summit 2013, hosted in Dubai, highlighted the water crisis. As UAE Crown Prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan put it:

“For the United Arab Emirates (UAE), water is now more important than oil.”

Rapid Growth in UAE

  • The UAEs rapid growth and urbanization have triggered an unprecedented unstainable demand for water
  • It has been reported that in the UAE, per capita water usage is 550 litres per person per day, as compared to a global national average of 250 litres per person each day (Gulf News 2010)
  • Precipitation rates are around 78 mm per year, as compared to 715 mm/year in the United States
  • There are almost no surface water resources in the UAE.

The Need for Pure Drinking Water Water Crisis… Closer Than We Think

By 2025, approximately one-third of the planet’s growing population could find itself scavenging for safe drinking water, the UN warned in March 2008;

Globally, water consumption is doubling every 20 years;

Throughout the world, water quality, availability and affordability are major public issues;

‘’Governments are recognizing water as an economic rather than a free commodity …Full pricing (of water) will make people take conservation more seriously…’’
Chairman, World Commission on Water